Terex Explorer 5500

In November of 2014, Terex announced that a 130-tonne capacity class, Explorer 5500 will be joining in their existing line of the Explorer all-terrain crane. This is to complement its “big brothers”, the Explorer 5600 and Explorer 5800.

Similar to other Explorer series, the Explorer 5500 is powered by a single engine. It reduces the operating cost for maintaining two engines and the control system automatically recognizes the power needed to its 368 kW (high power while travelling or energy-saving mode during crane operation) and reacts accordingly. A start-stop function is also fitted with the crane as a safety feature. Alternatively, a 331 kW engine is also available for markets that only requires Euromot 3a and Tier 3 emission standards.

thumbnail of Terex Explorer 5500 Datasheet Metric
Metric, EN
thumbnail of Explorer 5500 spec lb en v2014
Imperial, EN

Additional Information

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The Explorer 5500 comes with a 60-metre main boom and three offset-table jib extension configuration are available – 11, 21 and 33 metres. The maximum lifting height can go up to 86.5 metres while the maximum load moment is 395 tonne-metres. In addition, the boom can be telescoped under a maximum load of 24.5 tonnes. The maximum outrigger width is only 7 metres with possible intermediate outrigger configuration of 2.54 and 4.7 metres as well.

Its five-axle carrier is 12.1 metre long and overall length 14.3 with a width of 2.75 metres, The compact size of the crane allows better maneuverability within the cities area and congested job sites. In order to meet different road regulations, there are variable axle loads and axle pair intervals. In addition, the boom can be demounted or the crane can travel with a dolly.

Terex took consideration in reducing running costs for the Explorer 5500, therefore it is designed that all components can be transported on one standard support vehicle. The electronically controlled braking system is also been used to reduce brake wear and operating cost while having more brake power. Easy access to service points for diesel and DEF tanks to be reached from the ground are some other examples in Terex’s effort to simplify use and maintenance of the crane.

Milestones

Glasgow-based Leggat Plant has taken delivery of the first Explorer 5500 all-terrain crane in the UK in April 2015

Leggat Plant owner Eddy Donaghy said: “Our last Terex crane, Challenger 3160, delivered in September 2013, has proven so successful and enjoyed such a high utilisation rate, that we had no hesitation in choosing this latest model from Terex. A more than competent performer delivering a high degree of

A more than competent performer delivering a high degree of manoeuvrability, with duties unmatched by other machines, it promises to be an invaluable addition to the fleet in this fast-growing sector of the market.”